Department of History

Courses

Dr. Austin McCoy addressing students

Auburn history faculty have won numerous awards for their committment to excellent teaching at both the undergraduate and graduate levels.  History courses at Auburn emphasize the development of research, writing, and speaking skills in addition to gaining a deeper understanding of the past and how it has shaped the world today.  

The Auburn Course Bulletin lists all the courses currently in the Auburn curriculum, but course offerings change from semester to semester.  To the left you can find lists of past and future courses and instructors, as well as old syllabi, to see what new opportunities a history course might hold for you.  Below are descriptions of the kinds of courses that are offered at each level.  

Undergraduate Course Levels


1000-Level Courses

These are normally large courses (up to 350 students) designed to provide students with a basic knowledge of key global historical developments and to introduce them to issues of historical analysis.  In HIST 1210 and HIST 1220 (and in special sections of HIST 1010 and HIST 1020) lectures are complemented by in-class discussions facilitated in smaller break-out class sections.

2000-Level Courses

These are medium-sized courses (up to 35 students) designed to deepen students’ knowledge of historical developments in broad geographic regions and increase their understanding of the key events, issues, and concepts that shaped particular historical periods.

3000-Level Courses

These are medium-sized courses (up to 35 students) designed to familiarize students with thematic historical questions and issues that are not primarily defined by place and time. These courses allow students to develop a detailed understanding of a particular historical context, theme, or issue in order to articulate their own interpretations and analyses of history and/or historiographical debates.

“One of the best class experiences I’ve had here at Auburn.”

Historian's Craft (HIST 3800) 

This is a special class for history majors which introduces them to the process of researching, writing, and presenting an original historical research project.  

5000-Level Courses

These are small-sized courses (up to 15) designed to give students opportunities to master historical research, writing, and oral communication. These courses focus on closely defined periods /geographic areas or key historical developments, and encourage students to identify and pursue their own original research interests within this framework. They are taught in conjunction with parallel graduate courses at the 6000 level.

Senior Thesis (HIST 4950)

The final step to achieving a history degree, Senior Thesis requires all majors to write a polished pieces of  original historical research.  Final presentations of thesis work to the faculty are the capstone to the course.  

Graduate Course Levels


6000-Level Courses

These are small-sized courses (up to 15) designed to give students opportunities to master historical research, writing, and oral communication. These courses focus on closely defined periods /geographic areas or key historical developments, and encourage students to identify and pursue their own original research interests within this framework. They are taught in conjunction with parallel undergraduate courses at the 5000 level. 

7000-Level Courses

These are seminar courses which make up the majority of a Ph.D. student's coursework while in the program.  Small groups meet regularly with a professor to discuss a particular book or topics prepared in advance. All students are expected to participate actively in the discussion. This form of teaching does not involve lectures. If unfamiliar with the background to a topic, students are normally expected read up on it by themselves.

8000-8600 Level Courses

These are readings courses, consisting of regular meetings with a professor to discuss particular books or topics, prepared in advance. The workload will be equivalent to that of a seminar. Students taking readings courses are normally expected to have had prior coursework in the field.

Last Updated: May 22, 2019