Caroline Marshall Draughon Center for the Arts & Humanities

The Land of Dixie: Race, Identity, and the Landscape of the American South

The Land of Dixie: Race, Identity, and the Landscape of the American South

The public is invited to “The Land of Dixie: Race, Identity, and the Landscape of the American South,” a talk by 2017 Breeden Scholar Mark Hersey, on Thursday, February 2 at 4 p.m. at Pebble Hill.

This talk explores the intersection of nature and culture in the South by focusing on the ways in which southern identity came to be bound up with the region's landscapes. In doing so, it highlights how southern landscapes could serve to naturalize regional institutions like Jim Crow, and, conversely, how ideas about what it meant to be southern could alter the landscape itself in surprising ways.

Mark Hersey is an Associate Professor of History at Mississippi State University, where he directs the Center for the History of Agriculture, Science, and the Environment of the South (CHASES). He is the author of My Work Is That of Conservation: An Environmental Biography of George Washington Carver. He is currently at work on a book project that explores the history of the physiographic Black Belt of Alabama and Mississippi, paying special attention to the connections between identity, land use, race, and poverty. Hersey is a graduate of the University of Alabama and holds a Ph.D. in U.S. Environmental History from the University of Kansas. 

The Daniel F. Breeden Eminent Scholar was established in 1989 to provide support for both the academic and the outreach missions of the College of Liberal Arts. The chair is supported by an endowment from Dr. Daniel F. Breeden.

The event is free, open to the public, and will be followed by refreshments. The Caroline Marshall Draughon Center for the Arts & Humanities at Pebble Hill is located at 101 S. Debardeleben Street, Auburn.

For more information on the program, call 334-844-4903 or visit www.auburn.edu/cah

Last Updated: January 31, 2017