Caroline Marshall Draughon Center for the Arts & Humanities

Symposium on the Men behind the McKenney-Hall Portraits of Creek Indians

Symposium on the Men behind the McKenney-Hall Portraits of Creek Indians

The public is invited to “Facing History: The Men Behind the McKenney-Hall Portraits of Creek Indians” on Thursday, November 15 from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Caroline Marshall Draughon Center for the Arts & Humanities at Pebble Hill.   

The symposium will feature the collection of McKenney-Hall lithographs on display at Pebble Hill, including William McIntosh, who originally signed the Treaty of Indian Springs, as well as many of the 1825 Creek delegates to Washington D.C. who protested the treaty. Speakers will set the images into context and discuss family and clan connection, costumes and material culture, and the forced migrations that began in 1836.

Presenters include Andrew Frank, Florida State University; Kathryn Braund, Auburn University; Christina Snyder, Pennsylvania State University; Alex Colvin, Auburn University; Kent Reilly, Texas State University; Raven Christopher, Alabama Department of Archives and History; Chris Haveman, University of West Alabama; and John Ellisor, Columbus State University.

For more information, or to register, visit aub.ie/facinghistory. The registration fee for the symposium is $25 and includes lunch. Seating is limited.

The Caroline Marshall Draughon Center for the Arts & Humanities at Pebble Hill is located at 101 S. Debardeleben Street, Auburn. For more information on the program, call 334-844-4903 or visit www.auburn.edu/cah

 

��: Nahetluc Hopie, or Little Doctor

An Upper Creek chief from Tuckabatchee, Nahetluc Hopie’s name likely refers to his position as a “medicine man.” His wife’s grandfather through the paternal line was the British trader Joseph Cornells, who was also the paternal grandfather of Opothle Yoholo, the speaker for the 1825 delegates.

Details provided by Superintendent McKenney about his face and body paint provide insight into Creek practices. An early Smithsonian report noted, “The red spots on his dress mark the balls that he received when he was surprised in his hut. The three lower balls were lower than marked in the picture. The paint on the face is commemorative of the same event, as the blood ran from his nostrils and mouth.” Details about the attack on Nahetluc Hopie do not survive.

Click here for more information aboutt he McKenney-Hall portrait gallery at Pebble Hill. 

 

Last Updated: October 22, 2018