Caroline Marshall Draughon Center for the Arts & Humanities

Noted Alabama Historian to Discuss Black Church in 19th-Century Alabama

Noted Alabama Historian to Discuss Black Church in 19th-Century Alabama

Dr. Richard Bailey, Road Scholar for the Alabama Humanities Foundation, will discuss the role of the black church in 19th-century Alabama—including the significance of Tuskegee’s own Butler Chapel AME Zion Church—on Wednesday, October 8 at noon at the Tuskegee History Center (104 South Elm Street) as part of the “Our Common History” series.

During the days of slavery and freedom, the black church was the most significant institution in the black community, and a minister served as teacher, lawgiver, counselor, psychologist, and in any other role required.  Bailey will discuss these aspects, as well as the considerable influence black churches had on Alabama politics and education after the Civil War.

Dr. Richard Bailey is the author of two books on Alabama history, They Too Call Alabama Home, African American Profiles, 1800-1999 and Neither Carpetbaggers Nor Scalawags: Black Officeholders during the Reconstruction of Alabama, 1867-1878.  Books will be available for purchase and signing at the program. 

The “Our Common History” series is sponsored by the Tuskegee History Center, Tuskegee University Department of History and Political Science, and the  Caroline Marshall Draughon Center for the Arts & Humanities in the College of Liberal Arts at Auburn University, with support from the Alabama Humanities Foundation, a state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities. The events are free and open to the public.

For more information on the series, please call 334-844-6198 or visit auburn.edu/ourcommonhistory.

Butler Chapel AME Zion Church

 

 

 

 

Last Updated: November 08, 2016