Department of Philosophy

Courses


Fall 2019

Lower Division

Table of courses, times, days and faculty for lower division
Course Number Course Title Instructor Day Time
PHIL 1010 Introduction to Logic Different Faculty    
PHIL 1017 Honors Logic T.Lockhart MWF 9:00
PHIL 1020 Introduction to Ethics Different Faculty    
PHIL 1027 Honors Ethics Hamawaki TR 11:00&2:00
PHIL 1030 Ethics and the Health Sciences Different Faculty    
PHIL 1037 Honors Ethics and the Health Sciences Bertrand TR 9:30
PHIL 1040 Business Ethics Different Faculty    
PHIL 1060 Philosophy East and West Long TR 11:00&2:00
PHIL 1070 Art, Value, and Society Different Faculty    
PHIL 1093 Philosophy of Race and Gender - online Phillips    
PHIL 1100 Introduction to Philosophy Jolley MWF 11:00
PHIL 1113 Ethical and Conceptual Foundations of Science - Online Shech    
PHIL 1120 Introduction to Environmental Ethics Hewitt MWF 10:00,11:00&12:00

Upper Division

Table of courses, times, days and faculty for upper division
Course Number Course Title Instructor Day Time
PHIL 2970 Life, Death, Cloning, and Organs: Contemporary Debate in Bioethics: This class is a debate-based introduction to bioethics, in which we will also read some short fiction (by authors such as Ted Chiang, among others) that will help us think about di�fficult issues. After a short introduction to logic and normative ethics, we will consider the following questions: Is death harmful to the person who dies? Is it rational to fear death? Is immortality desirable? What is

death and how should it be defined? Can there be an agreement as to what constitutes human death? Is physician-assisted suicide ever ethical? Is the deliberately induced abortion of a human pregnancy ethically justifable? Are there universal ethical principles that should govern the conduct of medicine and research worldwide? Is it morally acceptable to buy and sell organs for human transplantation? Were it physically safe, would human reproductive cloning be acceptable? Is there a legitimate place for human genetic enhancement? Is it ethical to patent or copyright genes, embryos, and their parts? Should we prohibit the use of chimpanzees and other great apes in biomedical research? Is there ever a circumstance in which a doctor may withhold information from a patient? Are international clinical trials exploitative?

Shech TR 12:30
PHIL 3100 Intermediate Ethics (Ethical Theory): This class will take students more deeply into philosophical ethics, with a heavy focus on developing those skills appropriate to

philosophers, viz. careful reading, writing, and argumentation. The topics covered will be drawn almost exclusively from meta-ethics and, as such, stand quite far from concern with the truth or falsehood of individual moral judgments. Instead we confront questions about the status of ethical systems in general, whatever their particular content: What is the content of moral judgment?How are moral judgments related to action and practice? Can such judgments stand on an objective basis without losing their distinctively ethical character? In addressing these, we will be recapitulating much of the story of philosophical ethics in the 20th century.

Rohrbaugh TR  11:00
PHIL 3110 Symbolic Logic: This course is an introduction to the techniques of modern logic. These include the representation of arguments in symbolic nota-

tion, and the systematic manipulation of these representations in order to show the validity of arguments. Along the way, we try to pay careful attention to the philosophical motivations for our logical apparatus.

T.Lockhart MWF 10:00
PHIL 3400 Medieval Philosophy: The confrontation between the Greco-Roman philosophical tradition on the one hand and Judæo-Christian/Islamic monotheism on the other gave birth to one of the most creative and subtle periods in the history of philosophy. In this course we will think with

and through the arguments of a number of mediæval philosophers, including Christian thinkers like Augustine, Boethius, Abélard, Aquinas, Scotus, Ockham, and Suárez; Jewish thinkers like ben Maimon and Saadia Gaon; and Islamic thinkers like Ibn Sina, al-Ghazali, and Ibn Rushd. Topics include: the existence and nature of God; faith and reason; knowledge and skepticism; universals and particulars; the nature of causality; free will and foreknowledge; soul and body; goodness and the nature of sin; and the justice of war.

Long MWF 12:00
PHIL 3640 Philosophy of Law: In this class, students will reflect on the nature and significance of law. Beginning with Socrates (Plato) and culminating with Hart

and Dworkin. What is law? What is the nature of legal obligation, if it exists? How are laws to be interpreted, applied? How are law and morality related?

Jolley MWF 9:00
PHIL 4970 Contemporary Aesthetics Theory: This senior seminar will explore state-of-of-the-art questions at the intersection of philosophical aesthetics, philosophy of mind and meta aesthetics, questions that are at the center of lively debates in the field of aesthetics today. These questions concern the possibility, nature and role of aesthetic reasons, aesthetic obligations, aesthetic agencies and aesthetic practices. Are there aesthetic reasons? What might make a reason aesthetic? We often say to each other, “You must watch this film,” “You have to listen to this album.” How are the “must” and “have to” used here? Do they issue obligations? If so, are these distinctively aesthetic obligations? Our agency is usually linked to our capacity to act, not to our capacity to aesthetically appreciate. And yet, talk about aesthetic agencies has been trending in the field. What makes agency aesthetic—is it the capacity to act in the face of aesthetic objects, questions and problems, or does the aesthetic domain require that we rethink the standard notion of agency? Finally, may aesthetics play a role in the shaping of agents, practices and communities under conditions of oppression? This seminar is linked to the First Meeting of the Southern Aesthetics Workshop, hosted by the AU Philosophy Department in the Fall. The first part of the seminar will consist in close reading of the workshop’s papers—all written by junior aestheticians from the

south—and in preparing to contribute to the workshop’s discussions.

Gorodeisky TR 2:00

Philosophy Courses

PHIL 1010 INTRODUCTION TO LOGIC (3) LEC. 3. Humanities Core. Basic logical principles and applications: definition, informal fallacies, categorical logic, elementary propositional logic, analogy, and selected inductive inferences.

PHIL 1017 HONORS LOGIC (3) LEC. 3. Pr. Honors College. Humanities Core. Basic logical principles and applications: definition, informal fallacies, categorical logic, elementary propositional logic, analogy, and selected inductive inferences.

PHIL 1020/1023 INTRODUCTION TO ETHICS (3) LEC. 3. Humanities Core. Major ethical theories from the history of philosophy, their foundations in epistemology and metaphysics, and their extension into social thought. May count either PHIL 1020 or PHIL 1023.

PHIL 1027 HONORS ETHICS (3) LEC. 3. Pr. Honors College. Humanities Core. Major ethical theories from the history of philosophy, their foundations in epistemology and metaphysics, and their extension into social thought.

PHIL 1030/1033 ETHICS AND THE HEALTH SCIENCES (3) LEC. 3. Humanities Core. Ethical inquiry into such major issues as abortion, eugenics, physician-assisted suicide, euthanasia, health-care delivery methods, and informed consent.

PHIL 1037 HONORS ETHICS AND THE HEALTH SCIENCES (3) LEC. 3. Pr. Honors College. Humanities Core. Ethical inquiry into such major issues as abortion, eugenics, physician-assisted suicide, euthanasia, health-care delivery methods, and informed consent.

PHIL 1040/1043 BUSINESS ETHICS (3) LEC. 3. Humanities Core. Types of ethical theory; application to such normative issues in commerce as advertising, management, and business abroad.

PHIL 1050/1053 INTRODUCTION TO POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY (3) LEC. 3. Humanities Core. Principal theories and thinkers in political philosophy from antiquity to the present.

PHIL 1060 PHILOSOPHY EAST AND WEST (3) LEC. 3. Humanities Core. Principal thinkers and theories in four philosophical traditions: Indian, Chinese, European, and Arabic.

PHIL 1070/1073 ART, VALUE, AND SOCIETY (3) LEC. 3. Humanities Core. Introduction to philosophical aesthetics, focusing on the relationship of artistic values and the extra-artistic values of societies that house them.

PHIL 1080/1083 INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION (3) LEC. 3. Humanities Core. Philosophy of religion, including questions about God's existence, relationship of reason and faith, religious epistemology, and language.

PHIL 1090 PHILOSOPHY OF RACE AND GENDER (3) LEC. 3. Humanities Core. Philosophical issues associated with race and gender, including role of biology and social construction, nature of prejudice, questions about justice and redress.

PHIL 1100/1103 INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY (3) LEC. 3. Humanities Core. Methods of philosophical inquiry and examination of selected philosophical topics. May count either PHIL 1100 or PHIL 1103.

PHIL 1110/1113 ETHICAL AND CONCEPTUAL FOUNDATIONS OF SCIENCE (3) LEC. 3. Introduction to the moral and conceptual foundations of science, concentrating on ethical facets of scientific research, theorizing, and knowledge production, as well as conceptual issues regarding the nature of causation, induction, scientific explanation and confirmation. May count either PHIL 1110 or PHIL 1113.

PHIL 1120 INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL ETHICS (3) LEC. 3. Ethical inquiry into environmental issues such as non-human animal welfare, environmental justice, global climate change, resource use, and conservationism versus preservationism.

PHIL 2970 GATEWAY SEMINAR (3) LEC. 3. An introduction to philosophy through special topics. The course is designed to provide students with the basic skills required for more advanced work in philosophy. Topics vary. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

PHIL 3050 AESTHETICS (3) LEC. 3. Pr. At least 3 credits in PHIL 1000-1999. Modern and contemporary theories of the nature of art.

PHIL 3060 PHILOSOPHY OF FILM (3) LEC. 3. Pr. At least 3 credits in PHIL 1000-1999. (Area l) Consideration of philosophical issues raised within particular films and by the nature of cinematic representation in general.

PHIL 3100 INTERMEDIATE ETHICS (3) LEC. 3. Pr. At least 3 credits in PHIL 1000-1999. (Area I) Overview of contemporary questions and positions in ethics, including moral realism, the rationality of moral action, subjectivism and non-cognitivism, naturalism, and various theories of practical reason.

PHIL 3110 SYMBOLIC LOGIC (3) LEC. 3. Pr. At least 3 credits in PHIL 1000-1999. (Area IV) Propositional logic and predicate logic through relations; natural language and logic; some philosophical problems in logic.

PHIL 3300 PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION (3) LEC. 3. Pr. At least 3 credits in PHIL 1000-1999. (Area II) Nature of religion, religious experience, religious knowledge, religious theories of humanity and evil, arguments for the existence of God and immortality of the soul.

PHIL 3330 HISTORY OF ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. At least 3 credits in PHIL 1000-1999. (Area III) Philosophical thought from the Pre-Socratics through the Hellenistic philosophers, emphasizing Plato and Aristotle.

PHIL 3340 HISTORY OF EARLY MODERN PHILOSOPHY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. At least 3 credits in PHIL 1000-1999. (Area III) Philosophical thought from Descartes to Kant, emphasizing major figures in the rationalist and empiricist traditions.

PHIL 3350 HISTORY OF LATE MODERN AND PRE-ANALYTIC PHILOSOPHY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. At least 3 credits in PHIL 1000-1999. (Area III) Philosophical thought from Kant to the Pre-Analytic philosophers, possibly including Schopenhauer, Hegel, Nietzsche, Kierkegaard, James, Brentano, Frege, Meinong, Cook-Wilson, Bradley, and Moore.

PHIL 3360 HISTORY OF EARLY ANALYTIC PHILOSOPHY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. At least 3 credits in PHIL 1000-1999. (Area III) Philosophical thought in the early Analytic period, including the works of Russell, Moore, Wittgenstein, and members of the Vienna Circle.

PHIL 3400 MEDIEVAL PHILOSOPHY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. At least 3 credits in PHIL 1000-1999. (Area III) Philosophical thought from late antiquity through the Middle Ages, with emphasis on the ideas of Plotinus, Islamic thinkers, Augustine, Abelard, Anselm, and Thomas Aquinas.

PHIL 3500 EPISTEMOLOGY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. At least 3 credits in PHIL 1000-1999. (Area II) Origin, nature, kinds, and validity of knowledge, with considerations of faith, institution, belief, opinion, certainty, and probability.

PHIL 3510 PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE (3) LEC. 3. Student must have taken at least one philosophy course prior to taking PHIL 3510. Empirical meaning, verifiability, measurement, probability, causality and determinism.

PHIL 3530 PHILOSOPHY OF PHYSICS (3) LEC. 3. An overview of the philosophy of physics, with attention to topics such as the nature of matter, motion, change, space, time, space-time, time travel, Einstein's theories of special and general relativity, and non-relativistic quantum mechanics.

PHIL 3540 PHILOSOPHY OF MIND (3) LEC. 3. Pr. At least 3 credits in PHIL 1000-1999. (Area II) Classical and modern texts on the phenomenology of consciousness and mind-body problems.

PHIL 3550 PHILOSOPHY OF LANGUAGE (3) LEC. 3. Pr. At least 3 credits in PHIL 1000-1999. (Area II) Survey of contemporary philosophical discussions of the nature of language.

PHIL 3600 CLASSICAL POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. At least 3 credits in PHIL 1000-1999. At least one course in philosophy at the 1000 level. Political thought of classical thinkers, including Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Mill, Spencer, and Marx. (Area I for PHIL major)

PHIL 3620 CONTEMPORARY POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY (3) LEC. 3. Pr. POLI 3020. or at least one PHIL course at the 1000 or 2000 level. A survey of major schools of 20th- and 21st-century political thought, including liberalism, communitarianism, libertarianism, feminism, and anarchism. May count either PHIL 3620 or POLI 4340.

PHIL 3640 PHILOSOPHY OF LAW (3) LEC. 3. Pr. At least 3 credits in PHIL 1000-1999. (Area I) Functions of law, including judicial reasoning, ground of authority, natural law, legal responsibility, punishment, civil disobedience, and the relation of law to ethics.

PHIL 3660 APPLIED ETHICS (3) LEC. 3. Pr. At least 3 credits in PHIL 1000-1999. Advanced philosophical study of the ethical issues that arise in intellectual endeavors, such as law, business, military science, and engineering.

PHIL 3700 METAPHYSICS (3) LEC. 3. Pr. At least 3 credits in PHIL 1000-1999. (Area II) Critical analysis of such topics as monism and pluralism, freedom and determinism, realism and nominalism, and the mind-body problem.

PHIL 3740 EXISTENTIALISM (3) LEC. 3. Pr. At least 3 credits in PHIL 1000-1999. (Area II) Selected works of such authors as Kierkegaard, Neitzsche, Sartre, Jaspers, and Heidegger.

PHIL 3970 SPECIAL TOPICS (3) LEC. 3. Pr. At least 3 credits in PHIL 1000-1999. Topics vary. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6hours.

PHIL 4110 ADVANCED LOGIC (3) LEC. 3. Pr. PHIL 3110 or Departmental approval. Advanced topics in logic. For example: soundness, completeness, incompleteness, set theory, proof theory, model theory, non-standard logics.

PHIL 4960 SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN PHILOSOPHY (1-6) IND. Pr., Departmental approval. Reading program on a particular philosopher, period, or problem. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

PHIL 4967 HONORS SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN PHILOSOPHY (1-3) IND. Pr. Honors College or Departmental approval. Reading program on a philosopher, period, or problem. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 3 credit hours.

PHIL 4970 SPECIAL TOPICS (3) LEC. 3. Pr. At least 6 credits in PHIL 3000-3999. Advanced topics in ethics and value theory, metaphysics and epistemology, or history of philosophy. Emphasis on readings drawn from the contemporary, professional literature. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 9 credit hours. Area distribution requirement fulfilled depends on class content.

PHIL 4997 HONORS THESIS (1-3) IND. Pr. Honors College. Senior thesis. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 3 credit hours.

PHIL 5950 SEMINAR (1-3) SEM. Pr., Departmental approval. Content varying from movements of thought to an intensive study of one of the great thinkers. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.

PHIL 6950 SEMINAR (1-3) SEM. Pr., Departmental approval. Content varying from movements of thought to an extensive study of one of the great thinkers. Course may be repeated for a maximum of 3 credit hours.

Last Updated: June 06, 2019