Skip to main content

Julia S. Charles featured on MSNBC's podcast Harlem On My Mind: Jessie Redmon Fauset

Julia S. Charles from the Department of English was featured on MSNBC's podcast Into America with Pulitzer Prize and Emmy Award winner, Trymaine Lee. During the interview, which is the third episode of a four-part miniseries for Black History Month, Charles discusses the life and legacy of a lesser-known Black woman of the Harlem Renaissance, Jessie Redmon Fauset.

In part three of Into America’s Black History Month series, Harlem on My Mind, Trymaine Lee spotlights the influence of Jessie Redmon Fauset. Langston Hughes called her one of the midwives of the Harlem Renaissance, but few today remember her name.

As literary editor for NAACP’s The Crisis magazine, Fauset fostered the careers of many notable writers of the time: poets Countee Cullen and Gwendolyn Bennet, novelist Nella Larsen, writer Claude McCay. Fauset was the first person to publish Langston Hughes, when The Crisis printed the poem The Negro Speaks of Rivers. Fauset was also a writer, penning essays and poems. She went on to write four novels, including There is Confusion (1924). Her focus on bourgeois characters and women’s ambition shaped the conversation about Black identity in Harlem at the time.

Charles, professor of English at Auburn University, sheds light on the full scope of Fauset’s work, including her complicated relationship with Dr. W.E.B. Du Bois and other notable Black thinkers. 

Listen to the podcast here.

 

Tags: Faculty Research Arts and Culture English

Media Contact

Vicky Santos
Director, News and Media Services
CLA Office of Communications and Marketing
334-844-7186
santovr@auburn.edu

Related Articles