Living Democracy

Living Democracy 2019

June 26, 2014
Collinsville Shows Diversity
Collinsville Shows Diversity

With a population reaching 2,000 people, Collinsville has the highest racial and ethnic diversity in DeKalb County. Of the population, 45 percent is non-Hispanic white, 9 percent African American and 43 percent Hispanic or Latino, with 3 percent from two or more races.

By Shaye McCauley
June 16, 2014
Girl Scouts of North-Central Alabama Help Students Discover Science Through Art
Girl Scouts of North-Central Alabama Help Students Discover Science Through Art

“Listen to the noise it makes!” Zack Wilkins demanded as he squeezed his Gak, prompting giggles from the eight other kids at the table. The room burst with chatter as the kids twisted the putty they had made. Christine Megill, Community Development Manager for the Girl Scouts of North-Central Alabama, walked around with capsules of food coloring, releasing a few drop in each student’s bag.

By Shaye McCauley
June 10, 2014
Collinsville Council Hears about Summer Initiatives
Collinsville Council Hears about Summer Initiatives

On Monday, June 2, I attended a Collinsville City Council meeting. I’ve had the chance to sit in on exactly two city council meetings in my life, and neither of them was in my hometown in Tennessee. After attending a meeting in Auburn, I realized how much goes on in a town and how much more happens behind the scenes than what we see.

By Shaye McCauley
June 4, 2014
Collinsville Students Discuss Community's Future
Collinsville Students Discuss Community's Future

Two dozen students focused on the future of Collinsville at a forum led by the David Mathews Center for Civic Life on May 19 in teacher Donna Jones’ classroom at Collinsville High School. At the forum, hosted by the Collinsville Public Library, teens discussed ways to make a difference by investing in the community by creating opportunities for youth engagement.

By Shaye McCauley
June 2, 2014
Historic Collinsville Baptist Church
Historic Collinsville Baptist Church

My mom, a native of a small town in Long Island, always told my sisters and me that living in a small town was like having a large family—barbers told stories about your granddad, neighbors knew your birthday, and your third grade teacher had also taught your aunt and graduated with grandma. “Living in a large city can be lonely by comparison,” she’d sigh.

By Shaye McCauley

Last Updated: April 04, 2019