Event Type Lecture Upcoming Events

Africana Studies Lecture Series

Thu, Jan 16, 2020
12:30 PM – 1:45 PM
RBD (Ground Floor Auditorium)

Curtis Jolly, Ph.D. Professor Emeritus of Agricultural Econ & Rural Social at Auburn University

 

Title: "Africa the forgotten continent: Why should Americans care?"

 

Summary: The media often portrays Africa as a poor and destitute continent. Does the U.S. need Africa? While the continent has faced its share of challenges in recent decades with bouts of wars, farming, and economic instability, the continent is one of the riches in the world. Africa is also very fortunate to have a heterogeneous population made up of a wide variety of cultures, beliefs, and languages with extreme resilience and tremendous purchasing power. A vibrant Africa is a great market for the U.S. and the World.

 

Open to students, faculty, and public. 

"New Testament Parables as Jewish Stories"

Thu, Jan 16, 2020
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM
Langdon Hall

Professor Amy-Jill Levine presents the lecture "New Testament Parables as Jewis Stories." Professor Levine is University Professor of New Testament and Jewish Studies at Vanderbilt University. She is author of The Misunderstood Jew: The Church and the Scandal of the Jewish Jesus and editor of several works on the historical Jesus and feminist readings of the New Testament and early Christian writings. The lecture is free and open to the public. For more information, contact J. Loxley Compton at comptja@auburn.edu.

Artist Talk and Closing Reception: Chakaia Booker

Wed, Jan 29, 2020
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM
Biggin Hall

Artist Talk and Closing Reception for "Auspicious Behavior" by Chakaia Booker. Free and open to the public. For more information, contact Sarah Odens at sao0014@auburn.edu.

Africana Studies Lecture Series

Thu, Feb 13, 2020
12:30 PM – 1:45 PM
RBD (Ground Floor Auditorium)

Timothy Askew, Ph.D. Professor of English at Clark Atlanta University

 

Title: "The Historical and Cultural Significance of the famous song, 'Lift Every Voice and Sing' ''

 

Summary: "Lift Every Voice and Sing," written by James Weldon Johnson and John Rosamond Johnson, has enjoyed enormous popularity throughout the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. African American educational, political, and cultural leaders have contributed to the reception of this song. My lecture on "Lift Every Voice and Sing" explores the issue of how the song offers a window in understanding the political and social consciousness of African Americans in each decade of the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries--historically and culturally. My lecture also addresses the on-going debate, historically and in contemporary America, about whether or not there should be a Black National Anthem.

 

Open to students, faculty, and the public.