Department of History

David C. Carter

David C. Carter Associate Professor
Thach 308-B
(334) 844-6859
dcarter@auburn.edu
Personal web site

Office Hours

  • Monday 4-5
  • Wednesday 1-2

Profile

David Carter, Associate Professor of History, received his PhD from Duke University in 2001 and a BA with Highest Honors in History from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1992. Dr. Carter's research interests are in the history of the civil rights movement, the history of the American South since the Civil War, and U.S. history since 1945. He is particularly drawn to the role of race and ideology in shaping American history.

Carter is the author of The Music Has Gone Out of the Movement: Civil Rights and the Johnson Administration, 1965-1968 (University of North Carolina Press, 2009), a study of the shifting relationships between the presidency of Lyndon Johnson and grassroots advocates of racial and economic equality. The book extends the traditional timeline of the civil rights movement beyond passage of the Voting Rights Act in 1965.

His article "The Williamston Freedom Movement: Civil Rights at the Grass Roots in Eastern North Carolina, 1957-1964," appearing in the North Carolina Historical Review (January, 1999), won the Robert Diggs Wimberly Connor Award given by the Review for the best article published in that journal in the preceding year. His biographical sketches of civil rights leaders Andrew Young and Julian Bond are featured in the two-volume reference collection Civil Rights in the United States, edited by Waldo Martin and Patricia Sullivan (Macmillan, 2000). More recently he has written the foreword to Frye Gaillard's Prophet from Plains: Jimmy Carter and His Legacy (University of Georgia Press, 2007), contributed an essay entitled "Romper Lobbies and Coloring Lessons: Grassroots Visions and Political Realities in the Battle for Head Start in Mississippi, 1965-1967" to the collection Making a New South: Race, Leadership, and Community after the Civil War, edited by Paul A. Cimbala and Barton C. Shaw (University Press of Florida, 2007), and published a chapter “From ‘We Shall Overcome’ to ‘We Shall Overrun’: The Transformation of US Media Coverage of the Black Freedom Struggle, 1964-1968, in Comparative Perspective,” in Media and Revolt: Strategies and Performances from the 1960s to the Present, edited by Kathrin Fahlenbrach, Erling Sivertsen, and Rolf Werenskjold (Bergahn Books, 2014).

Dr. Carter was involved for several years in collaborative research and writing on Lyndon Johnson's civil rights policies with Kent Germany of the University of South Carolina, resulting in the co-edited volume The Presidential Recordings: Lyndon B. Johnson: Mississippi Burning and the Passage of the Civil Rights Act (Norton, 2011). He has also served as a project consultant on civil rights history for the Persistent Issues in History Network, directed by John Saye of Auburn's College of Education and Tom Brush of Indiana University, which seeks to build a community of master teachers overseeing pre-collegiate history study. In the same vein, he has worked with Auburn and Opelika teachers as part of a Teaching American History grant program.

Prior to coming to Auburn University in 2000, Dr. Carter taught at Bates College in Lewiston, Maine and at Duke University. He teaches both undergraduate and graduate courses at Auburn, covering American history and historiography, historical methodology, the history of the U.S. South, African American history and various historical aspects of the civil rights movement in America, and world history. He served as the faculty advisor to the Auburn chapter of the Phi Alpha Theta History Honor Society for six years, from 2000 to 2006, and is a Lifetime Member of the Southern Historical Association and the Alabama Association of Historians. He is also an active member in the Organization of American Historians and the Alabama Historical Association.

Education

Representative Publications

Books

Articles and Book Chapters

  • "The Williamston Freedom Movement: Civil Rights at the Grass Roots in Eastern North Carolina, 1957-1964," North Carolina Historical Review (January, 1999)
  • "Romper Lobbies and Coloring Lessons: Grassroots Visions and Political Realities in the Battle for Head Start in Mississippi, 1965-1967," in Paul A. Cimbala and Barton C. Shaw, eds., Making a New South: Race, Leadership, and Community after the Civil War (University Press of Florida, 2007)
  • “From ‘We Shall Overcome’ to ‘We Shall Overrun’: The Transformation of US Media Coverage of the Black Freedom Struggle, 1964-1968, in Comparative Perspective,” in Kathrin Fahlenbrach, Erling Sivertsen, and Rolf Werenskjold, eds., Media and Revolt: Strategies and Performances from the 1960s to the Present (Bergahn Books, 2014).

Last Updated: February 01, 2017